SFS in the News

Nexon on the danger of labelling Trump a totalitarian

In an op-ed in the Washington Post, Professor Daniel Nexon explains the danger in comparing President Trump to totalitarians of the past. Nexon argues that exaggerating Trump’s totalitarian tendencies takes attention away from real threats to our democratic institutions.

Maxwell Hamilton (SFS ’04) on the Future of Democracy in Myanmar

In a discussion hosted by the International Institue for Strategic Studies, Maxwell Hamilton (SFS ’04), visiting fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, analyzed how the current crisis with the Rohingya Muslim minority is affecting Myanmar’s transition to a liberal democracy.

Kyle Rinaudo (SFS ’17) Runs for the Georgia House of Representatives

When Kyle Rinaudo (SFS ’17) threw his cap in the air last May to signify the end of his undergraduate education, he had no idea he would soon be running to represent Georgia’s 35th District in the state House of Representatives. If elected, the 21-year-old Acworth, GA native would become the state’s youngest representative and first Democrat in nearly two decades to represent his community.

Kathleen McNamara

McNamara Warns Euro Could Put Global Financial System at Risk

Kathleen McNamara, Professor of Government and Foreign Service, predicts that the declining Euro could endanger the rest of the global financial market. It has long played a “helper” role to U.S. financial hegemony, but McNamara says that “now, Europe’s “helper” status may well be in question.

Mastro Warns of Cracks in U.S. – South Korea Alliance

Oriana Skylar Mastro, assistant professor of security studies, observes that while the alliance between South Korea and the United States remains strong militarily, the political ties are more tenuous. After visiting Seoul in December, she believes “the politics of cooperation could be shaken up by unresolved differences or shocks.”

Jeffrey Anderson On Angela Merkel’s Attempt To Form A Coalition Government

Interviewed for an article in ThinkProgress, Jeffrey Anderson, professor of government and director of the BMW Center for German and European Studies, analyzed the domestic, regional, and global significance of ongoing talks between Angela Merkel and German political leaders to form a government coalition, after failing to secure a majority in last year’s parliamentary elections.

Matthew Carnes

Matthew Carnes, S.J. on the Pope’s Visit to Chile and Peru

Interviewed for a National Catholic Reporter article, Fr. Matthew Carnes, director of the Center for Latin American Studies, said that Pope Francis could address inequality in Chile and liberation theology’s legacy in Peru during his upcoming visits to these countries.

Shireen Hunter Says Risk of War With Iran Is Higher Than North Korea

The existence of a domestic pressure in favor of a U.S. attack on Iran increases the risk of military intervention, writes SFS professor Shireen Hunter in an op-ed for LobeLog. She further argues that the increasingly aggressive rhetoric from Trump administration officials should make the Iranian regime, which unlike North Korea, does not count with a deterrent or an allied great power, wary of an American attack.

Irfan Nooruddin

Irfan Noorudin on India’s State Elections

Speaking to CNBC, Indian politics professor Irfan Noorudin said that the Bharatiya Janata Party’s (BJP) loss of seats in Gujarat legislative assembly elections indicated that Prime Minister Narendra Modi has a lot of work to do, particularly in rural areas, ahead of the 2019 general election.

Charles Kupchan

Charles Kupchan on President Trump’s Foreign Policy

Interviewed for an article in the Christian Science Monitor, SFS professor Charles Kupchan said that President Donald Trump’s foreign policy dismisses a long-standing, bipartisan tradition to build and protect the U.S.-led liberal international order.

Hoffman on New Technologies for Radicalization

Professor Bruce Hoffman said in an interview with Newsy’s The Why about new trends in technology and terrorist radicalization, “What worries me the most is what’s the next new thing.”

Fair on Pakistan and the Myth of “Too Dangerous to Fail”

“This is not the first time, of course, that U.S. officials have called Pakistan out for its perfidy despite American generosity,” Professor Christine Fair wrote with Sumit Ganguly for Foreign Affairs, but, “This time, the situation is different.”

Arend speaks on foreign policy trends in 2018

Professor Anthony Clark Arend, Senior Associate Dean of Faculty and Graduate Affairs, spoke with Carol Castiel from Encounter on Voice of America about what 2017 meant for U.S. foreign policy and what challenges are in store for 2018.

Radelet on Declining Aid Flows to Liberia

Steven Radelet, director of the Global Human Development program and former economic advisor to the president of Liberia, commented on decreasing aid flows as President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf’s tenure comes to an end. When Johnson Sirleaf came into office, Radelet says, “donors lined up… I think a lot of it had to do with her competence and strategy.” As new president Weah enters office, it’s a risky time to depend on aid programs.

Ariane Tabatabai On Iranian-American Relations

Ariane Tabatabai, visiting assistant professor of Security Studies, commented on the effect of Trump’s Iranian policy and rhetoric in the past year. She worries that it has offended “not just the regime but also a majority of ordinary Iranian citizens.”

Byman on Troubles & Weaknesses of the Regime in Iran

“Iran is often painted as a powerful monster whose tentacles stretch across the greater Middle East,” writes Professor Daniel Byman, “but the Islamic Republic suffers from array of problems at home and abroad.”

Oriana Skylar Mastro on Observations from a Recent Visit to South Korea

Oriana Skylar Mastro, assistant professor of security studies, recently participated in a delegation trip to Seoul organized by the National Bureau of Asian Research and sponsored by the Korea Foundation. She articulates three observations from her time there about the perception and nature of the North Korean threat.

Shireen Hunter Warns “Dire Decisions Must Be Made” If Iran Is To Be Saved

Shireen Hunter, Research Professor at the Alwaleed bin Talal Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding, published an article about the recent protests taking place in Iran. After decades of disappointment, Hunter says, Iranian people want change. The country’s leadership “must come out of their paranoid world and enter the real world of the 21st century.”

Stent on divide between Trump and top advisors over Russia

Despite Mattis, McMaster and Tillerson “drawing a pretty tough line” on Russia, Professor Angela Stent told CNN, “What we’ve seen all year really is the dual policy of President Trump wanting to have a much closer relationship with Putin.”

Mastro on US-China Sharing Intel About North Korea

“China is a major strategic competitor with the United States,” Professor Oriano Skylar Mastro said, “I’m guessing that it probably was not the degree of actual detail of what we would consider in contingency planning that we would need to inform military operations,”