Theodore H. Moran

Theodore H. Moran
Professor
 
518 ICC
 

Professor

Marcus Wallenberg Chair in International Business and Finance

Director of Landegger Program in International Business Diplomacy


Theodore H. Moran holds the Marcus Wallenberg Chair in International Business and Finance at the School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University, where he teaches and conducts research at the intersection of international economics, business, foreign affairs, and public policy.  Dr. Moran is founder of the Landegger Program in International Business Diplomacy, and serves as Director in providing courses on international business-government relations and negotiations to some 600 undergraduate and graduate students each year.

His most recent books include Foreign Direct Investment in the United States: Benefits, Suspicions, and Risks with Special Attention to FDI from China, with Lindsay Oldenski, (Washington, DC: Peterson Institute for International Economics, 2013), and Outward Foreign Direct investment and US Exports, Jobs, and R&D: Implications for US Policy, with Gary Clyde Hufbauer and Lindsay Oldenski, assisted by Martin Vieiro, (Washington, DC: Peterson Institute for International Economics, 2013).

His work on developing countries includes FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT AND DEVELOPMENT: LAUNCHING A SECOND GENERATION OF POLICY RESEARCH. Peterson Institute for International Economics, 2011.

In 1993-94, Dr. Moran served as Senior Advisor for Economics on the Policy Planning Staff of the Department of State, where he had responsibility for trade, finance, technology, energy, and environmental issues.  He returned to Georgetown after the NAFTA and Uruguay Round negotiations.

Dr. Moran is consultant to the United Nations, to diverse governments in Asia and Latin America, and to the international business and financial communities. In 2000, he was appointed Counselor to the Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency (MIGA) of the World Bank Group.  In 2002 Dr. Moran was named Chairman of the Committee on Monitoring International Labor Standards of the National Academy of Sciences.  From 2007-2013, he served as Associate to the National Intelligence Council, addressing issues related to the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS).  From 2010, he serves on the International Advisory Council of Huawei.

Professor Moran received his PhD from Harvard in 1971.  He is a Non-Resident Senior Fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics and at the Center for Global Development.

The Moran family philanthropic activities focus on helping poor children and AIDs-orphans in Latin America and Asia.  Ted Moran and his daughter Grace are Partners in Mission with the Maryknoll Fathers and Brothers.


Areas of Expertise: Trade, Investment, Development, Jobs, Globalization, Foreign Investment and Development, Foreign Investment and National Security, Inward Investment in the US, Outward Investment from the US, Supply Chains, Consulting on Foreign Investment, Trade, Development and National Security

  • PhD (1971) Harvard University

Publications

Foreign Direct Investment in the United States: Benefits, Suspicions, and Risks with Special Attention to FDI from China, with Lindsay Oldenski, (Washington, DC: Peterson Institute for International Economics, 2013).

Outward Foreign Direct investment and US Exports, Jobs, and R&D: Implications for US Policy, with Gary Clyde Hufbauer and Lindsay Oldenski; assisted by Martin Vieiro, (Washington, DC: Peterson Institute for International Economics, 2013).

Foreign Direct Investment and Development: Launching a Second Generation of Policy Research: Avoiding the Mistakes of the First, Reevaluating Policies for Developed and Developing Countries, (Washington, DC: Peterson Institute for International Economics, 2011).

China’s Strategy to Secure Natural Resources: Risks, Dangers, and Opportunities. (Washington, DC: Peterson Institute for International Economics. 2010.)

Three Threats: An Analytic Framework for the CFIUS Process, (Peterson Institute for International Economics, 2009).