Katrin Sieg

Katrin Sieg
Professor
 
509 ICC
 

Professor


Katrin Sieg is Professor of German and European Studies jointly affiliated with the German department and the BMW Center for German and European Studies at Georgetown University.  She holds a PhD in Drama from the University of Washington, Seattle.  Her areas of research are modern and contemporary German theater, and European cultural studies.  She is the author of three monographs on twentieth-century German theater and performance, which focus on the politics of nationality, race/ethnicity, and gender/sexuality: Exiles, Eccentrics, Activists: Women in Contemporary German Theatre (University of Michigan Press, 1994); Ethnic Drag: Performing Race, Nation, Sexuality in West Germany (University of Michigan Press, 2002); and Choreographing the Global in European Cinema and Theater (Palgrave Macmillan, 2008).  She has published in journals in women’s studies, theater, German, and European studies.

Among her recent research activities and publications are several articles about the Eurovision Song Contest that grew out of her participation in an international, interdisciplinary research group examining the Eurovision Song Contest as a site where the “New Europe” is imagined and performed. In addition, one of her ongoing research interests is Turkish-German theater.  Currently she is working on a longer project with the working title Colonial Remains, which asks how cultural institutions ranging from museums to mass culture commemorate Europe’s colonial past, and how Afro European artists are participating in the project of cultural decolonization.


Areas of Expertise: Germany, theater and performance, feminism, critical race studies, European popular culture.

  • PhD (1991) University of Washington, Drama

Publications

Books:

Choreographing the Global in European Cinema and Theater.  New York: Palgrave MacMillan, 2008.

Ethnic Drag: Performing Race, Nation, Sexuality in West- Germany.  Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2002.

Exiles, Eccentrics, Activists: Women in Contemporary German Theatre, Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1994.

Articles (selection)

“Race, Guilt and Innocence: Facing Blackface in contemporary German Theater.” German Studies Review (in press, 2015)

“Remediating Fassbinder in Video Installations by Ming Wong and Branwen Okpako.”  Transit : A Journal of Travel, Migration, and Multiculturalism in the German-speaking World 10:1 (2014, in press).

“Wii are Family: Performing Race in Neoliberal Europe.”  Theatre Research International 38:10 (March 2013): 20-33.

“Cosmopolitan Empire: Central and Eastern Europeans at the Eurovision Song Contest.”  European Journal of Cultural Studies 16 (April 2013): 244-263

“Identity Issues in German Feminist Movements and Theater.”  Theater Research International 37:1 (2012) 74-76.

“Class of 1989: Who Made Good and Who Dropped Out of German

History.”  The German Wall: Fallout in Europe.  Ed. Marc Silberman.

New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011: 165-83.

“Black Virgins and the Discourse of Muslim Gender in Europe.”

New German Critique 109:37 (Winter 2010): 137-85.

“Homosexualität und Dissidenz: Zur Freiheit der Liebe in Heiner Carows Coming-Out.” Ed. Bettina Mathes. Die imaginierte Nation: Identität, Körper und Geschlecht in DEFA-Filmen. Berlin: DEFA Stiftung, 2007: 256-280.

“Beyond Orientalism: Masquerade, Minstrelsy, Surrogation.” Seminar 41:2 (May 2005): 191-208.

“Women in the Fortress Europe: German Feminist Crime Fiction as Antifascist Performative.” differences 16:2 (Summer 2005): 138-66.

“The Ambivalence of Antifascist Rhetoric: Victims, Artists, and the Masses in Elfriede Jelinek’s Stecken, Stab und Stangl.” New German Critique 92 (Summer 2005): 123-40.

“Post-colonial Berlin?  Pieke Biermann’s Crime Novels as Globalization Critique.” Studies in Twentieth Century Literature 28:1 (Winter 2004): 152-82.

“Indians: The Globalized Woman on the Local Stage.” Theatre Journal 55:2 (May 2003): 291-316.

“Sexual Desire and Social Transformation in Aimee and Jaguar.” Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society 28:1 (Fall 2002): 303-32.