1 New Centennial Lab (CLab) with travel ADDED for Spring 2019

Application Deadlines Extended for All CLabs
 
Applications now open 
CLabs are Centennial Labs are SFS classes built around an issue, idea, problem, or challenge in a real community. They are both cross-curricular and experiential at the core. Students work with one or more professors across disciplines to learn the theory critical to understanding the situation. They develop practical approaches or solutions within the “lab”; and share it with the community beyond the classroom. Preference for enrollment will be given to students who have yet to take a Centennial Lab. Some CLabs include a for-credit travel component, while some remain in DC or the region. 

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For Spring 2019, the four new CLabs with a travel component include:
Professors Rochelle Davis and Fida Adely
ARST 367 — 3 credit
ARST 368 — 1 credit (Spring break travel to Jordan)
Meeting schedule: R (Thurs) 11:00-1:30 pm
Application Deadline:  Thursday, October 18, 2018 at 11:59 pm 
Interviews:                   October 22-26, 2018
Please visit the application web page for more information, requirements, and eligibility.
The focus of this lab class will be on different types of development (e.g., community-based development, state-driven, NGOs, international bodies, etc.), and how development functions as solutions to situations of emergency crises and protracted displacement. Students will acquire theoretical background in both displacement and development as well as specific knowledge of development and displacement in the Arab world. The disciplinary focus is anthropological, addressing issues related to economics, politics, society, heritage, and law.
ARST 368 is an optional 1-credit opportunity to travel with faculty members to Jordan over spring break 2019 to learn about community-based development projects and the impact of displacement on communities. Students will then develop a final project related to community-based development in Jordan, or prepare a proposal for such a project in Iraq or Syria or for Syrian refugees. No specific background is required, although some knowledge of the region and Arabic is helpful. A willingness to travel in difficult conditions and follow specific instructions is essential for the travel component. Students should also be able to spend time in warm, sunny conditions and some hiking may be part of the program. Enrollment in the SFS Centennial Lab ARST 367 is mandatory and instructor approval is required.
Professors Daniel Byman and Chris Meserole
INAF 455-01 — 3 credit
INAF 455-02 — 1 credit (Spring break travel to California)
Meeting schedule: W  2:00 pm – 4:30 pm
Application Deadline:  Thursday, October 18, 2018 at 11:59 pm 
Interviews:                   October 22-26, 2018
Please visit the application web page for more information, requirements, and eligibility.
Radical but ostensibly lawful groups play an important role in fomenting violence and fostering a dangerous political environment. The white-supremacist Ku Klux Klan, the jihadist-oriented Al Muhajiroun and its spinoffs in Europe, and the “Incel” movement are only a few of the organizations that peddle hate and have had members involved in terrorism and political violence. Other groups, such as the followers of Insane Clown Posse (Juggalos and Juggalettes), are considered by some law enforcement entities to be gangs but are also are part of a broader cultural movement. In the United States and several other democratic countries, such groups have a right to free speech, but do they have a right to be on every Internet platform? How do Internet companies determine whom to ban and whom to permit to use their services? Are their alternatives approaches to banning content or users that technology companies should consider? What are the human rights and legal implications of these choices? These are some of the questions this course will address. With support from CitiVentures, the course will work with Google and the associated Global Internet Forum to Counter Terrorism to explore different technical, legal, and policy solutions to the problem of radical presence on the Internet. The professors will identify one or more research projects and direct a research team of 10-15 Georgetown students. The class will meet with experts in the Washington, D.C. area, have video discussions with Congressional staff, technology experts, counter-terrorism officials and other relevant experts from around the world.  Students would gain the following from the class: 1. Learn about several radical groups and how they exploit the Internet 2. Understand the basics of the architecture of the Internet and the implications of this for policy; 3. Gain insight into the legal, policy, and political environment facing Internet companies; and 4. Develop problem-solving skills. A professional relationship and site visits will enable students to apply their ideas to practical “inbox” problems facing Internet company executives, learn to present their ideas effectively, and incorporate professional feedback.
INAF 455-02 is an optional 1-credit class to travel with faculty members during spring break to California to meet with experts to learn more about the problems and potential solutions. Possible visits include Google, Facebook, Palantir, and other relevant Internet companies as well as non-profits like the Anti-Defamation League that have expertise in components of these challenges. (This list is subject to change.) Enrollment in the SFS Centennial Lab INAF 455-01 is mandatory and instructor approval is required.


Professors Elizabeth Ferris and Katharine Donato
INAF 455-05 — 3 credit
INAF 455-06 — 1 credit (Spring break travel to Sweden)
Meeting schedule: T 9:30am – 12:00pm
Application Deadline:  Thursday, October 18, 2018 at 11:59 pm 
Interviews:                   October 22-26, 2018
Please visit the application web page for more information, requirements, and eligibility.
About half of the world’s refugees are under age 18; children travel on their own, with families and with strangers in search of safety. This experiential hands-on course will examine the ways in which governments and civil society facilitate the admission and social integration of refugee and migrant children and families with a particular focus on the United States and Sweden. While US policies toward refugee and migrant children have been widely criticized in recent years, Sweden is a country known for its child-sensitive policies. Sweden was the driving force behind the Convention on the Rights of the Child, consistently supports programs to recognize the particular needs of refugee and migrant children, and has generous social policies. But Sweden too has come under pressure from anti-foreigner parties and its policies are changing. This is not a traditional course where professors lecture and students take notes. Rather it is a collective learning experience where faculty and students together work toward a common goal of discerning best practices in responding to the particular needs of refugee and migrant children. In addition to the rich learning experiences for all, the end product will be a jointly-authored report to be submitted for publication and, probably more importantly, to feed into international processes to improve the way refugee and migrant children are treated when they arrive in a new country and as they settle in. Students will learn from direct conversations with many child advocates and experienced humanitarian practitioners in the Washington area, such as Kids in Need of Defense, Save the Children, and the Jesuit Refugee Service about policy and practice in the US. Students and faculty will work together to produce an overview paper highlighting best practices for refugee and migrant children, and will suggest concrete ways in which better child-sensitive policies can be implemented elsewhere. This report is intended to support refugee and children’s advocates and will feed into on-going processes in the United Nations and the network of child protection agencies.
INAF 455-06 is an optional 1-credit opportunity to travel with faculty members to Sweden over spring break 2019 to engage with government and civil society representatives to analyze the ways in which refugee and migrant children’s needs are addressed in a country which is known for its highly effective and child-sensitive policies. Enrollment in the SFS Centennial Lab INAF 455-05 is mandatory and instructor approval is required.
 
 
Professor Dale Murphy
GBUS 491 — 3 credit 
GBUS TBD — 1 credit (Spring break travel to California)
Meeting Schedule: Tuesdays 3:30 pm – 6:00 PM
 
Application Deadline:  Thursday, October 18, 2018 at 11:59 pm